The Latest

Nov 26, 2013 / 2 notes
americanexpress:


A note from the Opportunist. 

Source: BoardOfWisdom.com
Aug 9, 2013 / 93 notes

americanexpress:

A note from the Opportunist. 

Source: BoardOfWisdom.com

Aug 8, 2013 / 25 notes

americanexpress:

"You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something — your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life." -Steve Jobs

Source: Words To Live By: 5 Timeless Commencement Addresses

by Maria Popova, BrainPickings.com

Jul 29, 2013 / 429 notes

pumped

futuretechreport:

Wearable Tech Ain’t Just Glasses and Watches
wildcat2030:

In the near future, a buzz in your belt or a pulse from your jacket may give you instructions on how to navigate your surroundings.
Think of it as tactile Morse code: vibrations from a wearable, GPS-linked device that tell you to turn right or left, or stop, depending on the pattern of pulses you feel. Such a device could free drivers from having to look at maps, and could also serve as a tactile guide for the visually and hearing impaired.
Lynette Jones, a senior research scientist in MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering, designs wearable tactile displays. Through her work, she’s observed that the skin is a sensitive — though largely untapped — medium for communication.
“If you compare the skin to the retina, you have about the same number of sensory receptors, you just have them over almost two square meters of space, unlike the eye where it’s all concentrated in an extremely small area,” Jones says. “The skin is generally as useful as a very acute area. It’s just that you need to disperse the information that you’re presenting.” (via Can you feel me now? - MIT News Office)



Wearable computers
Jul 21, 2013 / 168 notes

futuretechreport:

Wearable Tech Ain’t Just Glasses and Watches

wildcat2030:

In the near future, a buzz in your belt or a pulse from your jacket may give you instructions on how to navigate your surroundings.

Think of it as tactile Morse code: vibrations from a wearable, GPS-linked device that tell you to turn right or left, or stop, depending on the pattern of pulses you feel. Such a device could free drivers from having to look at maps, and could also serve as a tactile guide for the visually and hearing impaired.

Lynette Jones, a senior research scientist in MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering, designs wearable tactile displays. Through her work, she’s observed that the skin is a sensitive — though largely untapped — medium for communication.

“If you compare the skin to the retina, you have about the same number of sensory receptors, you just have them over almost two square meters of space, unlike the eye where it’s all concentrated in an extremely small area,” Jones says. “The skin is generally as useful as a very acute area. It’s just that you need to disperse the information that you’re presenting.” (via Can you feel me now? - MIT News Office)

Wearable computers

(via futurescope)

Programming Languages Segmented by Category
May 31, 2013 / 20 notes

Programming Languages Segmented by Category

May 29, 2013

A mix for Eden


Sunset Sky


Out there
Feb 25, 2013 / 60,217 notes
Sunset Sky

Out there

(via r2--d2)

Nov 24, 2012 / 47 notes

(via bosshunting)

Nov 18, 2012

YES! —> my dream